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5 Tips to Properly Wear Your Baby

Babywearing has always been a traditional and very functional way for women to carry their babies as they go about their activities at home or outside. Finding a proper carrier or method of babywearing is important, as it will help reduce pain and strain on your body postpartum. 

Whether you use a sling, wrap, or carrier, there are several things to consider to maximize comfort. 

1. If you have had a history of back pain prior to or during pregnancy, consider getting a carrier that has thick straps that criss cross on the upper back and wraps behind the lower back. Brands like Ergobaby and Babybjorn have various options and the straps are adjustable to fit your torso length and size. 

2. Before you secure your baby in the carrier, make sure that your baby is positioned well so that you’re not feeling more strain on your back or you feel like the straps are pulling your shoulders forward. You may feel this more if you have a longer/ shorter torso. 

3. Wraps and slings are great for newborns and smaller babies. They can hold up to 25-35 lbs and are lightweight and breathable, so ideal for warmer weather. If you’ve had neck or shoulder pain, make sure the fabric is not bunching up and instead resting evenly and comfortably on the tops of your shoulders. Ring slings are adjustable and can allow for a variety of positions, which is optimal for breastfeeding. 

4. If you have back pain and are using either a carrier without a low back strap or a wrap/ sling, consider additionally wearing a postpartum abdominal binder or brace that will give you more support and compression. 

5. Avoid standing for long periods of time when wearing your baby. Change positions often (like sitting intermittently), weight shifting, or pacing back and forth to avoid increased back strain or stiffness. 


Reach me if I can answer any questions on physical therapy, serving you locally in New York City or anywhere online virtually through “telehealth“.

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