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5 Yoga Stretches for the Pelvic Floor


These simple yoga poses target the pelvic floor, the inner groin, and deep hip muscles that commonly contribute to pelvic pain and tightness. Have a few yoga blocks, a strap, bolster, or pillows handy to help make the stretches feel more comfortable and restorative. 

  1. Seated/ Reclined Cobbler’s Pose (Baddha Konasana)
  • come into a comfortable seated or lying position with soles of the feet together
  • allow the knees to fall to the floor, propping them with pillows or blocks as needed 
  • a yoga strap can also be looped around the knees for a more restorative pose 

2.   Child’s Pose (Balasana)

  • come into all fours position and sit back on your heels, with the knees wide and feet together
  • rest your forehead on the floor or on a rolled up towel so that your body can fully relax in the pose 
  • arms are stretched forward or resting by your sides 
  • breathe deeply into the pelvis and into the low back 

3.   Garland’s Pose (Malasana)

  • Sit on a yoga block or another prop with knees/ feet wide apart (in a deep squat) 
  • Keeping your back as straight as possible, bring your hands together into prayer. Press the elbows outward to open up the hips. 
  • Option: Open the arms and place your left hand by your left foot. Reach the right arm upward to the ceiling and look up to your right hand. Hold for a couple of breaths. Repeat on other side.   

4.   Happy Baby Pose (Ananda Balasana)

  • Lie on your back and hug your knees to chest
  • Open the knees wide and hold either onto the back of your thighs or ankles. 
  • Work on pulling the knees toward the shoulders as you breathe into the pelvis. Try to keep the pelvis anchored on the floor 

5.   Pigeon Pose (Kapotasana)

  • Start by sitting on a bolster or a yoga block. Bend one leg in front of you and swing the opposite leg back, with the knee straight. The front knee should be pointing forward or to the side, with the entire leg and foot on the floor. 
  • Adjust the height of the props if you feel any discomfort in the knee or the pelvis. 
  • With the pelvis facing forward, inhale and lengthen your spine. Lift the crown of your head toward the ceiling. 
  • Exhale and fall forward, making sure that the pelvis stays even. Rest your forehead on your hands or on a yoga block. 
  • Option: Stay upright with the eyes closed, hands resting on the props. 

Reach me if I can answer any questions on physical therapy, serving you locally in New York City or anywhere online virtually through “telehealth“.

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